Guest Post: Where Is Our Oil Price Collapse?

With 40% of the world in or near recession, how come oil prices are still so high and much higher than last year, when the economies in Europe and the U.S. were expanding? The number of vehicle miles driven in the U.S. is still below the level reached 43 months ago and at the same level as early 2005. The price of a barrel of oil in early 2005 was $42. The U.S. is using the same amount of oil, but the price is up 112%. It seems the U.S. isn’t calling the shots when it comes to the worldwide supply/demand equation.

It would probably be a surprise to most people that U.S. oil consumption today is at the same level it was in 1997 and is 10% lower than the peak reached in 2005. This is not a reflection of increased efficiency or Americans gravitating towards smaller vehicles with better mileage. Americans are still addicted to their SUVs and gas guzzling luxury automobiles. It’s a reflection of a U.S. economy that has been in a downward spiral since 2005.

China’s oil consumption per capita has increased over 350% since the early 1980s to an estimated 2.7 barrels per year in 2011. Consumption per capita has risen nearly 100% in just the past decade. Oil consumption per capita in the U.S. currently ranks among the top industrialized nations in the world at 25 barrels per year. However, today’s consumption levels are approximately 20% lower than they were in 1979. China overtook the United States in auto sales in 2009. They now sell approximately 15 million new vehicles per year. India sells approximately 2 million new vehicles per year. The U.S. sells just over 12 million new vehicles per year. In China and India there are approximately 6 car owners per 100 people. In the U.S. there are 85 car owners per 100 people.

The Energy Information Administration issued their latest forecast and it does not bode well for lower prices:

Despite continued concerns over the pace of the global economic recovery, particularly in developed countries, the US Energy Information Administration expects worldwide oil consumption to increase this year and next spurred by demand in developing countries. US oil consumption, however, is forecast to contract from a year ago. Worldwide oil demand, led by China, will increase by 1.4 million b/d in 2011 to average 88.19 million b/d and by 1.6 million b/d in 2012, outpacing average global demand growth of 1.3 million b/d from 1998-2007, before the onset of the global economic downturn.

Continued at Zero Hedge here


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